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About This Journal

For the publishing history of Mythlore and to order copies, please visit:

Mythlore History & Back Issues

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Mythlore Subscriptions

Mythlore Index

The Mythlore Index Plus, a downloadable and searchable PDF, is free of charge and can be downloaded from the link on the left. The Mythlore Index Plus not only includes abstracts and indexing for all articles and reviews published in Mythlore through the most current issue, but also all issues of the Tolkien Journal, published Mythcon Conference Proceedings, and publications of the Mythopoeic Press. Articles are indexed by author, title, and subject, and reviews by author and author of item reviewed. The index is illustrated with classic black and white artwork from early issues by Tim Kirk and Sarah Beach. This essential reference in mythopoeic studies is updated within a few weeks after the publication of each Mythlore issue or new Mythopoeic Press book, and will be announced on our website and social media sites when available. Abstracts attached to articles in this archive are from the index, written by Edith Crowe or Janet Croft, and used under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.

Mythlore is fully indexed in the MLA International Bibliography and Expanded Academic ASAP, and partially indexed in other titles in the EBSCOhost, OCLC, Thomson Reuters, and Gale families. It is abstracted in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature and Bibliographic Index. The full text of Mythlore from 2002 onward is available in several Gale databases and from 2006 onward in several EBSCOHost and Chadwyck-Healey databases. It also has been indexed but dropped at different times by several other current indexes, including Arts and Humanities Citation Index and Current Contents, as well as by some indexes which no longer publish, such as Abstracts of English Studies and Children’s Literature Abstracts. However, since none of these services indexes or abstracts the entire run of Mythlore, nor do they index at the level of subject specificity our readers would find most helpful, we felt that creating our own index was an essential service for scholars and readers of mythopoeic literature.